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Helping Your Child With Homework Read Online

The goal of this selection of resources is to help students and their parents with the important ongoing project of homework. Below are tools for helping with learning strategies, motivation, memory, reading comprehension, and mathematics.

There are 23 articles in this section.

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Multisensory Homework Ideas

(2017)

Class lessons that engage students’ visual, auditory, and tactile/kinesthetic learning modes contribute to effective learning. But what about homework?

5 Simple Homework Strategies to Help Your Child

(2011)

Just as your children have schedules and expectations each day at school, it is important to have them at home as well. These five tips will jump-start your homework routine and make the process easier for everyone.

The Keys to Remembering What You Read

(2010)

Taking good notes while reading can help students improve concentration and actively engage with what they are reading. This excerpt from Homework Made Simple: Tips, Tools and Solutions for Stress-Free Homework describes a number of effective note-taking methods.

Avoiding Homework Wars

(2009)

Does your child have trouble finishing homework within a reasonable amount of time? Is homework a frequent family battle? Learn how to stay sane and help your child succeed.

New Electronics: Turn Them On for Learning

(2009)

Many computer products have built-in accessibility options such as text-to-speech, screen magnification options, or voice input controls. Learn what some of these optional features are and how to integrate them into instruction and studying.

Making It Stick: Memorable Strategies to Enhance Learning

(2008)

We all use strategies throughout our day to remember the variety of facts and ideas we need to retain. It is valuable for teachers, therapists, and parents to understand the memory process in order to become better equipped to help our students understand and use strategies.

Helping Children with Executive Functioning Problems Turn In Their Homework

(2008)

How can you help the child who does his homework, but then forgets to turn it in? Learn to help children with executive functioning problems plan and organize by reading these strategies.

Helping Children with Learning Disabilities Understand What They Read

(2008)

This article presents a variety of memory strategies. As parents, we need to pay attention to our child's reaction to the strategies and help our child select and use strategies that are comfortable and most closely match his or her preferred learning style.

Being an Efficient Homework Helper: Turning a Chore into a Challenge

(2008)

This article will help your child succeed doing homework. Read tips that can help kids with learning disabilities, ADHD, and dyslexia work faster and with focus. Set up a place for your child to work and give them the supplies they need. Teach them strategies, get them organized, and encourage them to succeed.

Strategies to Facilitate Math Concepts and Homework

(2008)

Dyxlexia expert Regina Richards offers some strategies that parents and teachers can use to offer students new and different ways to access math learning.

Independent Reading

(2005)

Suggestions for fostering independent reading include: (a) Give children books that are not too difficult. (b) Help them find books they will enjoy. (c) Encourage them to try many kinds of material. Although independent reading cannot substitute for teaching decoding, it improves reading comprehension and the habit of reading.

Tool Kit for Parents: Tips for Helping With Writing Tasks

(2004)

Over one hundred ideas on how you can help your child overcome their problems with writing caused by their learning disability. Help your child with POWER (Plan, Organize, Write, Edit, and Revise.)

Improving the Quality of Student Notes

(2004)

Much of classroom learning at the secondary and postsecondary levels depends on understanding and retaining information from lectures. In most cases, students are expected to take notes and to review them in preparation for testing of lecture material.

Learning Strategies

(2004)

Adapting Language Arts, Social Studies, and Science Materials for the Inclusive Classroom

(2004)

When instructional materials present a barrier to student learning, teachers often adapt the materials to allow students greater access to the information to be taught. These adaptations may involve changing the content of the materials (the nature or amount of information to be learned) or changing the format of the materials (the way information is presented to the learner).

Parents Partnering with Tutors

(2003)

Work well with your tutor and get results. Learn good questions to ask. This short article will set your relationship on the right track.

Five Guidelines for Learning Spelling and Six Ways for Practicing Spelling

(2002)

Here are some concrete techniques that children can use to study spelling. This article also shares guidelines teachers and students should keep in mind, because practice makes permanent.

Five Homework Strategies for Teaching Students With Learning Disabilities

(2001)

Many students with learning or reading disabilities find homework challenging. Here are five research-based strategies that teachers can use to help students.

Strategies That Work for Students Grade 9 to 12 with Dyslexia

(2001)

Tips for Parents to Encourage Writing

(1999)

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Does it feel like that school assignment is going to take FOREVER to complete? Looking for some inspiration? Here's a list of quick tips to give you the extra push you need to finish that pesky paper . . . and put a smile on your face!

  1. Make a List, Check It Twice: If you have assignments flying at you from all different subjects, create a priority list that starts with what's due soonest as number one. Chances are the due dates will be spread out over time, so what you thought was a gigantic load of work won't actually be that overwhelming. Rate all the assignments based on how long you think they'll take, which ones seem like the hardest, or by subject. No matter how you rank them, you can start methodically working through them, and once you finish an assignment, go ahead and check it off your list!
  2. Homework for kids: Get It Over With: If you only have one project to complete, JUST DO IT. Imagine how it's going to feel when that one essay is complete. You're free! You can play basketball! You can ride your bike! You can hang out with friends (assuming all their homework for kids is done too)!
  3. Work With Study Buddies: Bond over textbooks with your friends. As long as you guys keep focused on studying, working in a group may indeed increase your productivity. You're all working towards a common goal of completing your homework for kids and when it's time for a break, you're already together!
  4. Homework for kids: Take a Break: There's nothing wrong with taking a 15-minute break if you feel like you need to rejuvenate yourself. Get up, stretch, make a snack, IM friends, hop in the shower, call your grandma, write a letter — do something completely unrelated to homework for kids. Once you're refreshed, you'll be ready to concentrate again.
  5. Reward Yourself: Make a deal with yourself before you begin to make a sizable dent in your workload. It can be anything from "If I finish this paper a day early, I'll buy that new DVD I've wanted," to "When I finish 20 math problems, I get to watch the game on TV tonight."
  6. Homework for kids: Tap Your Feet: Understandably, some people can't concentrate with music playing. But if putting tunes on helps you plow through assignments, slip your favorite CD in the stereo or turn the radio on, and do your work to the flow of the melody. And consider this: studies have shown that the part of the brain that is used to solve mathematical problems is stimulated by classical music. So crank up the Mozart when you're multiplying fractions!
  7. Homework for kids: Show the Teacher What You Can Do: Maybe you're not looking forward to doing a paper because you got a bad grade on the last one. Well, take this as an opportunity to show the teacher what you've got! If you feel like the situation is hopeless, just imagine the look on your teacher's face when you blow him away with your brilliance.
  8. Homework for kids: Pump Yourself Up: Sometimes it's hard to settle down and do homework for kids because you've been sitting in class all day and need to burn off some excess energy. Do some jumping jacks or sit-ups, run a mile, or just dance around like crazy in your room. It'll get the adrenaline going, and you'll feel like homework is just a little hurdle to jump over. So get to it!

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